Peer Court DUI

The Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) partnered with the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) to develop and implement the Peer Court DUI Prevention Strategies Program. The goal of the program is to lower the number of DUI offenses in California by altering attitudes and behavior toward reckless activities through educating teens and parents on the dangers of drinking and DUI. An education curriculum specialist authored the DUI Prevention Curriculum with the input of eight mentor peer courts and the program’s planning committee, which consisted of technical and educational experts in the area of teen DUI prevention.

After the curriculum was developed, ten peer courts were awarded grants to implement the program. A web designer was hired to develop some of the statewide DUI prevention curriculum components into web-based information to supplement the curriculum. The website is currently available at www.stopteendui.com . The program and website were both professionally evaluated using pre, post and 3-month follow up surveys. 

DUI Peer Court
Teen Entrance Parent/Guardian Entrance

Peer Court DUI Prevention Program Evaluation

There were encouraging results when comparing the pre-survey and post-survey groups of youth. Nearly 78% of the youth peer court participants were educated through the program which resulted in statistically significant increases in knowledge for the teens from pre to post survey. Evaluation results indicate that youth, after receiving the training, demonstrated a more serious attitude towards DUI such as they were more likely to acknowledge that riding in a car with someone under the influence was likely to result in a crash. Another positive finding included the parents influence over their teens. According to the 3-month follow up surveys, the parents talked more frequently to their teens about alcohol/drugs and parents were more aware of who their teen’s friends were and where they went, after going through the curriculum.

The teens behavior change was most pronounced between the pre-survey and the 3-month follow up group. The follow-up survey reported that teens were significantly less likely to get into a vehicle with a driver under the influence.